An interesting question….

As a media outlet, we’ve become part of a lot of different social networks. One in particular, Merchant Circle, has a neat feature that lines up user questions with businesses that it feels are qualified to answer. Here’s one that was sent to us. Now, the question didn’t pertain to us directly, but our line of work deals with the reason she had to ask it to begin with, so we felt obliged to answer…
Question: What is the TV coverage 10mi S of DL,MN, especially 11.1 – sometime I get it- it breaks up, especially at night? Judy

Answer: Judy,
You can thank your cel phone for it. The main reason analog channels disappeared was because cel phones wanted to have streaming video. In order to achieve that, they needed airwaves which the FCC already owned and had occupied with ABC, NBC, etc… So the FCC sold the airwaves for LOTS of money, forcing you to buy a converter box to receive a digital signal. Now to answer your question:
A digital signal allows a lot of info to travel to a specific source (ie: your television.) The thing about it, is that a digital signal can be divided into an infinite amount of channels, although the more you do this, the weaker each signal becomes. The networks love this because more channels mean more ratings. 4.1, 4.2, 4.3…all come from one output source. To put this in a visual reference, imagine trying to push 30 ponds of mashed potatoes through a sewer pipe. Easy enough. Now try it through two garden hoses. Now try it through thirty straws. Getting a visual? This is your picture signal.
When you’re watching tv and it freezes up and turns into rainbow chex-mix, it’s because somewhere, a computer is trying to push a lot of info through multiple lines. Computers freeze up and lose signals. You lose your picture, sound and any punch-lines the character might deliver. You’re better off with cable, or better yet, reading a book. Or, just watch it on your cel phone.

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